Ios development

Developing Others by Strengthening their Abilities

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Developing others is part of your Empathy - a component of your Social Competence.

While Empathy, in general, is related to your awareness of other people’s needs and concerns; developing others relates to sensing their growth needs and strengthening their abilities.

People who have this competence usually:

  • Acknowledge and reward people's strengths and accomplishments
  • Offer useful feedback and identify people's needs for further growth
  • Show sensitivity to other people's feelings
  • Assign tasks that challenge and foster people's skills
  • Mentor and coach other people

We'll continue next week.

Cheers!

Understanding Others; the Active Aspect of Caring

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Understanding others is part of your Empathy -a component of your Social Competence.

While Empathy, in general, is related to your awareness, needs, and concerns of others; Understanding Others senses the feelings and perspectives of other people and makes you take an active interest in their concerns.

People who have this competence usually:

  • Are attentive to emotional cues
  • Listen well to what people say
  • Show sensitivity to other people's feelings
  • Understand other people perspectives
  • Help out without expectations

At a personal level, relationships are built by understanding other people. At a business level, businesses thrive when companies truly understand their customer's needs, feelings, perspectives - that's usually the purpose of marketing research: it aims to understand customer's needs and wants.

The Importance of Social Skills in Our Overall Social Competencies

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In our last blog, we had an overview of the different aspects related to Empathy as part of Social Competence; we will now cover aspects related to Social Skills

Social Competence relates to your ability to handle relationships in a positive way, and your ability to get along with other people. Social Skill is a part of your Social Competence personality.  

While Social competence, in general, relates to your ability to handle relationships properly, Social Skills relates to your effectiveness at inducing desirable responses in others.

People who have this competence usually:

  • Have influence
  • Good communication skills
  • Manage conflicts with great success
  • Bring leadership
  • Are catalysts of change
  • Build bonds
  • Collaborate and cooperate
  • Have team capabilities

We’ll be covering each of these eight aspects in details later on.

Empathy; Finding Echoes of Others within Yourself

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In our previous blogs, we covered all aspects of Personal Competence such as Self-Awareness, Self-Regulation, and Motivation. In our following blogs, we will cover all aspects of Social Competence, aspects such as Empathy and Social Skills.

Social Competence is related to your ability to handle relationships in a positive manner and your ability to get along with other people. Empathy is a part of your Social Competence personality.  

While Social competence, in general, relates to your ability to handle relationships properly, Empathy relates to your awareness of other people's feelings and perspectives.

People who have this competence usually:

  • Have an understanding of others
  • Can sense the developing needs of others
  • Are service oriented
  • Leverage Diversity
  • Have Political Awareness

Each of these five aspects will be covered in detail later on. 

Use SMART Goals Standard to Reach your Maximum Potential

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Whether you call them goals, objectives, targets, or your Holy Grails, if you want them to ever become a reality in your life, they need to be something specific and measurable.

SMART stands for Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Relevant and Time-bounded. If the goals you’re setting for yourself comply with this standard you will have a bigger chance of achieving them than those, for instance, that are too vague or don’t come with a specific deadline.

 

So, the SMART standard goes like this:

S, for Specific: Your goal must be clear and detailed enough so anybody can understand it –including and especially yourself!

M, for Measurable: always add dates, numbers, and amounts; “more money”, or “less weight” won’t work. You’ll have to set an exact number; that is, how much of that do you want (we’ll also add a “by when” a few lines later).

A, for Attainable: your goal should be something able to be accomplished given the specific amount, deadline and all the circumstances around it. This doesn’t mean you choose to go on the easy way –something that too easy to achieve; but shouldn’t mean that you are going after the fantasy either (like losing 100 pounds in a week). Be smart and don’t limit yourself based on your beliefs, but don’t set yourself up for the impossible.

R, for Realistic: and this means it should be in line with your life purpose. It is a waste of time to climb all the way to the top of the ladder only to find that it was leaning against the wrong wall.

T, for Time-Bounded: here it is our “by when”. Setting a deadline for the completion of your goal adds a vital accountability and motivational factor to this formula. If you don’t have the pressure to make it happen, you won’t do what’s necessary.

 

For example: if your goal is to do some jogging but never seem to find the time –or the will, you’ll get more “motivation” with a mean Rottweiler chasing after you than with a friend sweet-talking you into it.

And I’d like to add one more item to the list:

Align your Goals with the Greater Good; see that you don’t harm anyone in the process of achieving it.


Like the great coach Jack Canfield stated once: “you can have a goal of breaking 50 car antennas on your way home… It’s specific, measurable, attainable, and time-bounded; but you’ll surely harm a lot of people in the process…

So keep this in mind: always see that the fulfillment of your goals would help create a better world for everyone.

 

And remember,  if you ever find yourself a little short in the motivational department, wel... you can always get a Rottweiler.